Barn Owl
Blackbird
Blackcap
Black-headed Gull
Black Redstart
Blue Tit
Brambling
Bullfinch
Buzzard
Carrion Crow
Chaffinch
Chiffchaff
Coal Tit
Collared Dove
Common Gull
Coot
Crested Tit
Crossbill
Cuckoo
Dunnock
Feral Pigeon
Fieldfare
Garden Warbler
Goldcrest
Goldfinch
Goshawk
Great Black-backed Gull
Great Spotted Woodpecker
Great Tit
Greenfinch
Green Woodpecker
Grey Heron
Grey Partridge
Grey Wagtail
Hawfinch
Herring Gull
Hoopoe
House Martin
House Sparrow
Jackdaw
Jay
Kestrel
Kingfisher
Lapwing
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Lesser Spotted Woodpecker
Lesser Whitethroat
Linnet
Little Owl
Long-eared Owl
Long-tailed Tit
Magpie
Mallard
Marsh Tit
Meadow Pipit
Mistle Thrush
Moorhen
Nightingale
Nuthatch
Peregrine
Pheasant
Pied Flycatcher
Pied Wagtail
Quail
Raven
Red Kite
Red-legged Partridge
Redpoll
Redstart
Redwing
Reed Bunting
Ring-necked Parakeet
Robin
Rook
Sand Martin
Serin
Short-eared Owl
Siskin
Skylark
Song Thrush
Sparrowhawk
Spotted Flycatcher
Starling
Stock Dove
Stonechat
Swallow
Swift
Tawny Owl
Treecreeper
Tree Sparrow
Turtle Dove
Waxwing
Whinchat
Whitethroat
Willow Tit
Willow Warbler
Wood Pigeon
Wren
Yellow Wagtail
Yellowhammer

British Garden Birds Logo Home page. Bird identification guide. Site map. Discussion board. Articles on birds and birdwatching. Having problems? Search this website. Photograph album. Guestbook for your comments. News about the birds in my garden. Contact us. Test your identification skills. About this website. Field trip reports. Links to other websites. Awards won by this website. British Garden Birds Navigation Map

Week 8 - 21st May 2006

The chicks flesh started to darken and, in particular, dark stripes started to appear on the back, wings and tail. In fact, these stripes are the pin feathers, which are the feathers as they emerge from the skin, and occur along tracts, called pterylae, in various parts of the chick's anatomy.

At the start of this week, Fidge and Fudge, the parents, were making about 40-50 feeds per hour, mostly with grubs and only the occasional caterpillar. The continuing rain seemed to take its toll the following day (22nd) as the feeds became more erratic; sometimes barely 20-30 feeds per hour as they seemed to either be flying further or taking longer to find food, and then as high as 70-80 feeds per hour when they would return with a few mangled aphids. The chicks became noticeably lethargic.

On the 23rd, the change in their appearance was remarkable, seemingly growing as you looked at them. Some of the chicks started to preen their wing pin feathers and both parents continued to bring food - grubs interspersed with suet.

The next day (24th), we were heartened the next day to see 10 gapes - for 2 or 3 days we had repeatedly been able to count 9 only. Despite providing mealworms, the parents ignored them and continued to feed the chicks with larvae, aphids and suet.

The chicks' wing feathers became clearly visible on the 25th. By now, the nest cup is far too small for all the chicks, but Fidge seems to have been busy loosening the inside of the cup, undermining the top edge, and giving them more room.

During Friday 26th May, the chicks became adventurous and tunnelled through the nest material and broke through the surface in the corner of the nest box! The chicks' eyes are still closed, but they are preening more often and even starting to flap their little wings. Their tail feathers are starting to grow too. Among the chicks in the nest cup an egg has appeared, so it would seem she had laid 11 eggs but one has failed to hatch and remained hidden until now.

Saturday morning (27th) revealed a regimented brood of chicks. During the night, Fidge must have been busy making the nest cup larger in diameter so that all the chicks could sit comfortably. At last, they also opened their eyes and have become quite noisy when the parents arrive, their begging calls being audible from nearly 10 metres away (unfortunately, there's a problem with the microphone inside the box).

Throughout the week, Fidge has repeatedly dived head first among the chicks, rummaging through the nest material looking for parasites and possibly shaking dandruff - from the emerging feathers - into the bottom of the box. Also, she looks over the chicks and can occasionally be seen to remove something from their bodies before eating it.

21st May
21st May
22nd May
22nd May
23rd May
23rd May
24th May - 10 chicks
24th May - 10 chicks
25th May - Wing pin feathers visible
25th May - Wing pin feathers visible
26th May - Adventure playground
26th May - Adventure playground
27th May - Fidge cleaning the nest
27th May - Fidge cleaning the nest
27th May - 10 contented chicks
27th May - 10 contented chicks

 


Last revision: 21 Feb 2015
Copyright © David Gains 1999-2017.
Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites