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Week 3 - 16th April 2006

Well, she has had us on tenterhooks this week. Just when you thought the nest was complete, she removed a lot of the hair, feathers and other fluffy material and then brought it back in again. A couple of nights she did not stay in the nest, which had us worried for a while, but then she has slept in the nest for the last 3 nights.

During the day, she visits a few times - sometimes she brings a beakful of fluffy material and places it somewhere in or around the cup, but other times simply sits in the nest for a few moments. Whether or not she has brought nest material, she often fidgets and stretches to shape the nest cup: first, she will sit in the cup and fidget as if doing the "twist and shake", then she stretches her wings and legs to push against the sides.

Her mate is always close-by. When she is in the nest box, he is usually standing sentry either in our nearby Forsythia tree or some other vantage point. Once or twice she has remained in the nest, clearly listening to her mate giving his alarm call and then does not venture out until he has presumably given the "all clear". Once she leaves the nest he appears to either escort or follow her - this may be to ensure no rival has his wicked way with her!

At night time, she returns to the box between about 8:30 and 9:30 PM. No sooner has she tucked her head under a wing than she'll start fidgeting or preening.

Another night
Another night
Sat listening to her mate calling
Sat listening to her mate calling

 


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