Barn Owl
Blackbird
Blackcap
Black-headed Gull
Black Redstart
Blue Tit
Brambling
Bullfinch
Buzzard
Carrion Crow
Chaffinch
Chiffchaff
Coal Tit
Collared Dove
Common Gull
Coot
Crested Tit
Crossbill
Cuckoo
Dunnock
Feral Pigeon
Fieldfare
Garden Warbler
Goldcrest
Goldfinch
Goshawk
Great Black-backed Gull
Great Spotted Woodpecker
Great Tit
Greenfinch
Green Woodpecker
Grey Heron
Grey Partridge
Grey Wagtail
Hawfinch
Herring Gull
Hoopoe
House Martin
House Sparrow
Jackdaw
Jay
Kestrel
Kingfisher
Lapwing
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Lesser Spotted Woodpecker
Lesser Whitethroat
Linnet
Little Owl
Long-eared Owl
Long-tailed Tit
Magpie
Mallard
Marsh Tit
Meadow Pipit
Mistle Thrush
Moorhen
Nightingale
Nuthatch
Peregrine
Pheasant
Pied Flycatcher
Pied Wagtail
Quail
Raven
Red Kite
Red-legged Partridge
Redpoll
Redstart
Redwing
Reed Bunting
Ring-necked Parakeet
Robin
Rook
Sand Martin
Serin
Short-eared Owl
Siskin
Skylark
Song Thrush
Sparrowhawk
Spotted Flycatcher
Starling
Stock Dove
Stonechat
Swallow
Swift
Tawny Owl
Treecreeper
Tree Sparrow
Turtle Dove
Waxwing
Whinchat
Whitethroat
Willow Tit
Willow Warbler
Wood Pigeon
Wren
Yellow Wagtail
Yellowhammer

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British Garden Birds is dedicated to helping garden birdwatchers to identify and enjoy the birds that visit their gardens, and to understand the birds' lives and behaviour.

This month... Did you know?
In August, Cuckoos and Swifts start their return journeys to their African wintering grounds, while others, like Chiffchaff, will be building up their fat reserves in time for their departure by gorging on autumn fruits. Our gardens may also be quieter because many of the usual visitors will also be gorging on berries in woodlands and hedgerows. Some species migrate to their wintering grounds in one non-stop flight and others do it in several short stages. Before departing they gorge themselves on berries to build up their fat reserves, which can then be converted to energy for flight. Their body weight may increase by up to 50%.
Vote now! Things to do...
Vote Now! (Opens in new window)Gardens are an important habitat for birds, not just for food and shelter, but also for rearing their families. Have any birds nested in your garden this year? Vote now! The Wildlife & Countryside Act allows you to clean out your nest boxes between 1st August and 31st January. However, some birds may be having late broods and so it is better to leave things for at least another month or so. More >>

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Last revision: 31 Jul 2015
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